Browse Encyclopaedia by Subject
Abbreviations
Actors
Aircraft
Architecture
Computer Viruses
Costume
Food & Drink
Gazetteer
General Information
Heraldry
Language
Latin
Medicine
Money
Movies
Music
Mythology
Nature
People
Recreation
Rocks & Minerals
SciTech
Shakespeare
Ships
Slang
Warfare

Free Photographs

Antiquarian Map Archive

The Probert Encyclopaedia of Warfare

IMA MB 50

Picture of IMA_MB_50

The IMA MB 50 was a Brazilian-made licensed copy of the Danish Madsen Model 1946 sub-machine-gun (which is almost identical to the Madsen M50) used by the Brazilian armed forces and police. The IMA MB 50 was a blowback operated, automatic weapon chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge which it took from a 32-round box magazine. It had a cyclic rate of 650 rounds per minute and a muzzle velocity of 280 meters per second. The IMA MB 50 had a 213 mm long barrel, a folding stock and blade foresight and an aperture rearsight.
Research IMA MB 50
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to IMA MB 50

IMP

Picture of IMP

The Colt IMP was an American gas-operated sub-machine-gun/rifle firing either single-shot or full automatic. Two models were produced, a sub-machine-gun model in .223 M 193 calibre and a survival rifle model in .17 Frankford Arsenal calibre. The IMP takes a 10-tound or 30pround box magazine and has an effective range of 300 meters. The sub-machine-gun model has a 305 mm long barrel and a muzzle velocity of 854 meters per second.
Research IMP
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to IMP

INGRAM MAC-10

Picture of Ingram_MAC-10

The Ingram MAC-10 is an American sub-machine-gun designed in the 1960s by Gordon B Ingram. Because of its small size and high rate of fire it is difficult to control and subsequently was rejected for use by most security and armed forces, including the SAS who tested it. The MAC-10 was originally chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge, and now the 9 mm Parabellum cartridge which is fired at between 1050 and 1150 rounds-per-minute from a 30-round box magazine.
Research Ingram MAC-10
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to Ingram MAC-10

INGRAM MODEL 10

Picture of Ingram_Model_10

The Ingram Model 10 was an American blowback operated, selective fire sub-machine-gun produced from 1970 and intended as a compact weapon for urban use and with a silencer. The Model 10 took a .45 ACP or 9 mm Parabellum cartridge from a 30-round box magazine, had a rate of fire of 1145 or 1090 rounds per minute and a muzzle velocity of 280 or 366 meters-per-second firing the .45 ACP or 9 mm cartridge respectively. The Ingram Model 10 had a telescopic stock and a 146 mm long barrel. A long barrel with a special receiver was also produced as an optional accessory to increase the effective range of the weapon.
Research Ingram Model 10
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to Ingram Model 10

INGRAM MODEL 11

The Ingram Model 11 was an American variant of the Ingram Model 10 sub-machine-gun chambered for the .380 Auto cartridge. The Ingram Model 11 had a 129 mm long barrel and a cyclic rate of 1200 rounds per minute with a muzzle velocity of 293 meters per second.
Research Ingram Model 11
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to Ingram Model 11

INGRAM MODEL 6

Picture of Ingram_Model_6

The Ingram Model 6 was an American sub-machine-gun made for the US police force, and also supplied to Cuba and Peru and manufactured under licence in Peru. The Model 6 was made from 1949 to 1952 in the .45 ACP calibre and took a 30 round magazine. It had a rate of fire of 600 rounds per minute.
Research Ingram Model 6
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to Ingram Model 6

INGRAM MODEL 7

The Ingram Model 7 was an American modification of the Ingram Model 6 sub- machine-gun, firing from a closed bolt.
Research Ingram Model 7
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to Ingram Model 7

INGRAM MODEL 8

The Ingram Model 8 was an American modification of the Ingram Model 6 sub-machine-gun, with a long fore-end rather than a pistol grip.
Research Ingram Model 8
Search for Pictures and Maps Related to Ingram Model 8

Your host - Matt Probert

The Probert Encyclopaedia was designed, edited and programmed by Matt and Leela Probert

©1993 - 2014 The New Society For The Diffusion of Knowledge

Southampton, United Kingdom

 
Home  Publishers  Map Archive  Picture Library  FAQ  Privacy Policy  Contact  Site Map