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Research Results For 'Sternocleidomastoid'

DEEP CERVICAL CHAIN

The deep cervical chain of lymph nodes are located on each side of the neck beneath the sternocleidomastoid muscle. These chains of lymph nodes drain and filter lymph from the thyroid gland, the larynx, the trachea, and the upper portion of the esophagus. Because they lie deep within the body tissue, they are difficult to assess through palpation.
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MANUBRIUM OF STERNUM

The manubrium of the sternum is the broad, disc-like, upper part of the sternum. It articulates with the body of the sternum at the manubriosternal joint. The manubrium of the sternum articulates with the clavicles and the sternocleidomastoid, sternohyoid, and sternothyroid muscles connect here. The top of the manubrium features the small jugular notch which admits passage of the jugular vein along the bone.
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STERNOCLEIDOMASTOID

The sternocleidomastoid (sternocleidomastoideus; sternomastoid) muscle is located in the neck. It is a thin, broad muscle that narrows at the center. It originates from two heads, one from the sternum and and one from the clavicle , and runs upward, inserting into the mastoid process. The sternocleidomastoid muscle is innervated by the accessory nerve and the cervical plexus. It is supplied by the occipital artery ans the superior thyroid artery. This muscle is used to tilt the head from side to side.
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STERNUM

Picture of Sternum

In anatomy, the sternum (also known as the breastbone) is a flat, blade-like bone located at the center of the chest. It serves as the anterior site of articulation for the ribs via cartilaginous connections, called costal cartilage. The pectoralis major also anchors to the sternum, giving the shoulder joint much of its strength during flexion of the arm. The sternum features two articulations in addition to its costal articulations. One of these, called the manubriosternal joint, is between the body of the sternum and the broader upper section, called the manubrium. The manubrium of the sternum articulates with the clavicles and the sternocleidomastoid, sternohyoid, and sternothyroid muscles connect here. The lower articulation is called the xiphisternal joint, and is between the body of the sternum and a small, teardrop-shaped bone called the xiphoid process. The xiphoid process anchors the rectus abdominis, the transverse thoracic, and the diaphragm muscles, responsible for much of the muscular expansion and contraction of the abdomen.
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